Joy of Lifelong Learning

Sign up for semester-long academic courses at reduced rates as a Joy of Lifelong Learning student. Students aged 55 and up can access exceptional NIC faculty, facilities and learning opportunities from a wide array of more than 80 interesting arts, science, creative writing and fine arts academic courses.

Explore Joy of Lifelong Learning courses

An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

An introduction to the fundamental principles or jurisprudence and the basic legal institutions of Canada. An examination of the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts, and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, an analysis of the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and the principles of statutory interpretation. Also introduces the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. It introduces some of the major political, social and economic events that shaped early Canadian development.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course surveys world civilizations from ancient times to the beginning of the Medieval era. It will include study of such areas of history as ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Japan and India; classical Greece and Rome; Africa and pre-contact America; and Islam, Byzantium, Western Christendom. The focus will be upon identifying broad themes, issues and patterns in world history, and upon accounting for political, social, cultural, intellectual, religious and economic change.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course surveys the world of early modern Europe from the flowering of the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, through the age of the religious wars in the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century Age of Enlightenment, and developments in eastern Europe and Russia, culminating in the great watershed of the French Revolution. In addition to covering military and political developments, the course also describes the changes wrought in the social and economic lives of the people of the emerging nation states of Europe.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

An examination of ethical issues arising in the contemporary business context. A number of classical ethical theories are introduced and applied to a variety of concrete problems such as whistle-blowing, product safety, employee rights, discrimination, international business, the environment, and investing. Emphasis is on mastery of the key ethical concepts and their application to real-life situations.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

An introductory course designed to acquaint students with some of the fundamental concepts, theories, perspectives and debates in the International Relations field. Topics will include such issues as international security (war, peace, military force; international organizations, international law and human rights; North-South politics; global environment crises; and the growth of a global political economy. Although it is not a course in current affairs per se, integration of contemporary world events and issues will be used to enhance critical understanding.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

The course covers the following topics: research methods; biological bases of behaviour; consciousness; nature, nurture and diversity; development; sensation and perception; learning; and memory. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

The course covers the following topics: research methods; thinking and language; intelligence; what drives us; emotions, stress and health; social psychology; personality; psychological disorders; therapy. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course will introduce students to some of the major concepts, issues, and approaches in the discipline of sociology, including ethnicity, gender or sexuality. The course is designed to encourage the student to think more deeply about the relationship between personal troubles and public issues.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course, containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12 and meeting the same requirements of BIO 060, is designed for non-science majors who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for BIO 102/BIO 103 and/ or BIO 160/161. Topics include an introduction to concepts in cell biology beginning with basic concepts in chemistry, cell structure, cell energetics, cell division and genetics. The last part of the course will focus on human anatomy and physiology. Throughout the course the connection between topics covered and human health will be emphasized.

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

Cost

Each course costs $105 + administrative fees (application, student union and learner fees apply).

Who can apply

Canadian citizens and permanent BC residents, aged 55+.

Students who pay appropriate tuition and fees no later than the first day of classes for the term.

Students who register as an auditing student in Joy of Lifelong Learning courses.

How it works

Students will not be charged a non-refundable deposit at time of registration but will be subject to fee and refund deadlines. Students take as many Joy of Lifelong Learning courses as they like; however, they cannot register more than once for the same course at the reduced rate. As audit students in Joy of Lifelong Learning courses, assignments and exams are optional. Instructors have agreed to provide feedback on summary assignments and projects. However, university transfer credit is not awarded to auditing students on course completion. Students who wish to register in courses for credit must pay the full tuition and meet the admission and course prerequisites.

Register

Once you find courses that match your interests, check the location and timetable to find courses that fit your schedule. Bring your completed joy of learning application form and your ID with you to any NIC Registration Office. As an audit student, transcripts are not required; however, please review the course details so you will be prepared to join the class activity. Once registered, you will receive an email to your personal email address providing you with an NIC student ID and log in information. Pay your tuition and fees no later than the first day of classes for the term.