Search Results

ANT-150 Cultural Anthropology

3 hours lecture/tutorial, or distance (D), 3 credits


This audio-visual course focuses on the cross-cultural study of human diversity. Topics include patterns of subsistence, linguistics, social, political and economic organization, religion, aesthetics, and the future of humanity.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ANT-151 Physical Anthropology & Archaeology

3 hours lecture/tutorial, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090, or Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ANT-250 Ethnology of North America

3 hours lecture/tutorial, 3 credits


An examination of traditional and post-contact aboriginal societies using a culture area approach. This background will lead to consideration of the status of Aboriginal People in contemporary Canadian Society.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ANT-251 Principles of Archaeology

3 hours lecture/tutorial, 3 credits


This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ANT-260 Forensic Anthropology

1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 3 credits


This is an introductory course of forensic anthropology, a branch of physical anthropology. Forensic anthropology involves human osteology, and is directed towards identifying human remains for legal purposes. Students will learn to assess through physical remains the sex, stature, and 'age at death' of human specimens, as well as the validity of determining 'genetic heritage'. Students will learn to understand how teeth and bones can give evidence of behaviourial patterns, trauma and disease, and how to assess cause and manner of death, and the effect of a postmortem interval on determining the above.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ANT-293 Third Rock Archaeology

18 hours lecture, 12-21 days travel, 3 credits


This archaeology course combines academic study with first person experience of archaeological sites as part of a tour group. This course is only offered in the Spring or Summer semester, and will feature a series of preparatory and follow-up lectures and seminars.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090; and signed liability waiver.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-102 Principles of Modern Biology II

3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This is one of a pair of biology courses for science majors that introduce students to the biological concepts necessary to continue into second-year biology. This course is designed to provide students with a general survey of major areas of biology. Topics include ecology, evolution, cell division, genetics, DNA and genes, classification and diversity. The course includes extensive laboratory components.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Biology 11, Biology 12, BIO 051, BIO 060 or BIO 110.
  • C in one of Chemistry 11 or CHE 051
  • Take BIO 102L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-103 Principles of Modern Biology 1

3 hours lecture + 3 hour lab, 3 credits


This is one of a pair of biology course for science majors that introduce students to the biological concepts necessary to continue into secondy-year biology. This is designed to provide students with a general survey of major areas of biology. Topics include biological chemistry, cellular organization and respiration, photosynthesis, and plant and animal structure and function. The course includes an extensive laboratory component.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Biology 11, Biology 12, BIO 060 or BIO 110.
  • C in one of Chemistry 11 or CHE 051.
  • Take BIO 103L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-110 Concepts of Biology I (Inhabiting the Human Body)

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course, containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12 and meeting the same requirements of BIO 060, is designed for non-science majors who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for BIO 102/BIO 103 and/ or BIO 160/161. Topics include an introduction to concepts in cell biology beginning with basic concepts in chemistry, cell structure, cell energetics, cell division and genetics. The last part of the course will focus on human anatomy and physiology. Throughout the course the connection between topics covered and human health will be emphasized.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in English 11, ENG 052 or placement testing. English 12 highly recommended. It is also recommended students have CHE 051 or Chemistrty 11, although this is not required.
  • Take BIO 110L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-111 Concepts in Biology II (Inhabiting the Earth)

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is designed for non-science students who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for Biology 102 and 103. Topics include a brief review of cell division and genetics to provide a grounding for the discussion of evolution. The course will also provide an introduction to the diversity of life with investigations into the evolution of plant and animal structure and function. Finally, basic concepts in ecology will be introduced to provide a grounding for the discussion of current environmental issues.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.
  • Take BIO-111L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-160 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is the first half of a comprehensive survey of human structure and functions. Topics include: biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary musculoskeletal, nervous and endocrine systems. An extensive laboratory component is included.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Biology 12, BIO 060 or BIO-110.
  • C+ in Chemistry 11 or CHE 051. Biology and Chemistry prerequisites must have been completed within the last 10 years.
  • Take BIO-160L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-161 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is the continuation and completion of the comprehensive survey of human structures and functions started in Human Anatomy and Physiology I. It includes an extensive laboratory component.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in BIO 160
  • Take BIO-161L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-170 Foundations of Ethnobotany

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


Foundations of Ethnobotany provides students with a broad survey of the major areas of study within the discipline of ethnobotany. Topics include: folk taxonomy, plant identification and ecology, origins of agriculture, traditional foodways, phytomedicinals, fibre technologies, and plants and community. Global indigenous experiences will be used to illustrate course material and when possible, examples from Pacific Northwest cultures will be included. The laboratory component of this course illustrates and further explores lecture topics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, NIC ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL-090, or placement testing.
  • Take BIO-170L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-200 Cell Biology

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


A study of the ultrastructure and function of cell organelles and membranes, DNA and chromosomes, cellular movements and cellular reproduction.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102, BIO 103, CHE 110 and CHE 111 Minimum Grade C
  • Take BIO-200L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-202 Principles of Genetics

3 hours lecture + 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits(may be offered in alternate years)


A study of the principles and mechanisms of inheritance, including an analysis of transmission genetics, the nature and function of the genetic material, molecular genetics and population genetics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in BIO 102 and BIO 103.
  • C in CHE 110 and CHE 111.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-211 Invertebrate Biology

Scheduled lecture and Lab (3 hours/week) or distance (1.5 hours tutorial via MITV) with lab sessions arranged with instructor, 3 credits(may be offered in alternate years)


An introduction to the major invertebrate taxa from sponges to chordates with emphasis on functional anatomy, life-cycles, evolution, diversity and ecology. A compulsory 3-day field trip to the West Coast of Vancouver Island is an integral part of this course. Lab work involves first hand and microscopic observations of living animals with some dissections. Field work involves observations of intertidal and subtidal invertebrate individuals and their community ecology.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102 and 103 or BIO 110 and 111 Minimum Grade C
  • Take BIO-211L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-215 Introductory Microbiology

3 hours lecture,3 hours lab, 3 credits


This is an introduction to the field of microbiology. Topics covered include: prokaryotic cell structure and function; microbial growth, factors affecting growth, and control of growth; microbial metabolism; prokaryotic genetics and gene regulation; microbial classification and diversity; and, viruses. Specific skills learned in the laboratory include: sterile technique, bacterial culture, microscopy and staining, serial dilution, bacterial metabolism, fecal coliform testing, and antimicrobial agents in the control of microbial growth.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Bio 102/103 or Bio 160/161 or Bio 110/111 Minimum Grade C
  • Take BIO-215L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-230 Principles of Ecology

3 hours lecture , 3 hours lab, 3 credits


An introduction to the basic principles of ecology. BIO 230 explores the physical components of the environment, adaptations of organisms to the physical environment and how elements of the environment influence the distribution and abundance of organisms. Community structure and dynamics, ecosystem energetics, nutrient cycles, and biological interactions at the population, community, and ecosystem levels are examines. The lab series offers students hands-on opportunities to study natural systems and practice several sampling techniques. The majority of the labs take place in an outdoor setting and may include a 2-day field trip during a weekend.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102 & BIO 103 or BIO 110 & BIO 111. Minimum Grade C STA 115 or MAT 115 is strongly recommended
  • Take BIO-230L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-241 Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK)

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course will explore Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) as it relates to contemporary health and environmental issues with particular emphasis on topics relevant to First Nations people of Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland. Students who do not meet course prerequisites but have life or work experience that would qualify them to enrol in this course are encouraged to contact the instructor.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102 and BIO 103 or BIO 110 and BIO 111 or BIO 170 and BIO 171 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-260 Pathobiology I

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is the first half of an overview of basic health science. It provides an introduction to the principles of pathophysiology, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, and nutrition relevant to nursing. The focus is on concepts and mechanisms, with prototype diseases and prototype drugs given as examples. A series of assignments provides opportunities to investigate other diseases that may be encountered in the clinical area.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 161 and enrolment in the 2nd year Nursing Program Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-261 Pathobiology II

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is the continuation and completion of the introduction to the principles of pathophysiology, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, and nutrition started in Pathobiology I. Again, the focus is on concepts and mechanisms, with prototype diseases and prototype drugs given as examples.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 260 and enrolment in the 2nd year Nursing Program Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BUS-217 Management Accounting

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


Studies the role of the management accountant, cost concepts and terminology, cost flows, cost allocation, job and process costing, service departments, standard costs and variances, joint products, relevant costs and pricing.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in BUS 100 or BUS 113

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BUS-223 Taxation I

3 hours lecture, 3 credits*


This course is the first course in a two-part series that provides an introduction to the Canadian Income Tax system. It will introduce the basic principles and practices of individual taxation. Topics include residency, employment, business and property income, capital gains and losses, calculation of personal taxes payable and administration of the tax system.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in BUS 100 or BUS 113

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BUS-244 Finance

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course provides students with a general framework for financial decision-making. Topics include financial markets, valuation, portfolio theory, the risk-return tradeoff, the firm's required rate of return, capital budgeting, capital structure, and working capital management. Note: The ability to work with spreadsheets is an advantage, but is not required.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in BUS 113 or BUS 100; and BUS 132 and STA 115 or MAT 115.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BUS-318 Advanced Cost Accounting

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is a continuation of BUS 217. It provides an advanced discussion of topics such as cost behaviour, relevance and the decision process, pricing decisions, management control systems, cost allocation including joint products/by-products, profit planning in uncertainty and the use of decision models, regression and variance analysis. This is a cost recovery course; special tuition fees apply.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BUS 217 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BUS-323 Taxation II

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is the second course in a two part series that provides an introduction to the Canadian Income Tax system. It will introduce the basic principles and practices of corporate taxation. Additional topics include partnerships, trusts, international taxation and administration of the tax system.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BUS 223 or BUS 222 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CPS-100 Computer Programming I

3 hours lecture + 1 hour lab, 3 credits


This course is an introduction to computer programming. Students will be introduced to problem solving methods and algorithm development using the object-oriented programming paradigm. The students will learn how to apply problem analysis, program design, and program implementation while using the top-down and stepwise refinement design methods. The course also provides an introduction to the object-oriented programming paradigm and recursive functions. This course will provide a sound basis for later courses in computer science. Note: Basic computing skills are assumed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Principles of Math 11 or MAT 053.
  • C in one of Provincial English 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CPS-101 Computer Programming II

3 hours lecture + 1 hour lab, 3 credits


This course continues with the techniques and tools introduced in CPS 100 for development and maintenance of software systems and documentation. The main emphasis is on classic structures and basic algorithms in the object-oriented programming paradigm. The introduced object-oriented data structures include strings, vectors, lists, stacks, queues, trees, and hash tables. Several searching and sorting algorithms are introduced in the context of applicable data structures. Topics also include data abstraction, information hiding, encapsulation, layers of abstractions, program design, separate compilations, component re-use, software libraries, and techniques for development of professional quality software components.


Prerequisite(s):

  • CPS 100 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CPS-146 Database Fundamentals

3 hours lecture + 1 hour lab, 3 credits


This course introduces fundamental database concepts and database systems development methods with an emphasis on relational database design and implementation. Topics include DBMS concepts, data modeling, data normalization, database implementation, Structured Query Language, client-server databases, web database applications, and database administration issues. A popular database management system will be used to learn the concepts and to complete the assignments/projects. Note: Basic computer skills are assumed. Students with little computer experience should take CPS 143 or an equivalent course before taking CPS 146.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12; English First Peoples 12, or ENG 098, ENG 096, ENG 060 or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CRM-101 Introduction to Criminology

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-115 Essay Writing and Critical Analysis

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or ENG 160; or English assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.0 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-117 Academic Writing

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course is an introduction to university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences. It is designed to help students acquire the research skills and understand the writing practices used by scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. As a way of focusing discussion, students will examine different disciplinary approaches to a single research topic. Note: Credit will only be granted for ENG 115 or ENG 117 or ENG 125.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, NIC ENG 098, ENG 096, ENG 060 or ESL 090, or C or better in any University-transferable English course, or English assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-202 Survey of English Literature I

3 hours lecture or distance (D), 3 credits


This course surveys significant works of English literature from the late Medieval and Renaissance periods, focusing on major authors: Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Works are studied within the context of the philosophical, social, religious and political thought and conditions of the times.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-203 A Survey of English Literature II

3 hours lecture or distance (D), 3 credits


This course will survey English Literature of the 18th and 19th centuries, focusing on the works of major authors from a list including Swift, Pope, Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, the Brontes, Eliot, Arnold, Tennyson and Browning. Works will be examined within the context of the philosophical, social and religious aspects of life in the Neo-Classical, Romantic and Victorian Periods.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12,ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-209 Creative Writing: Fiction

3 hours lab, 3 credits


ENG 209 is a second year university studies writing workshop that focuses on the method and craft of fiction. Students will examine the work of successful fiction authors and nurture their fiction writing skills through the workshop method. Students will create a portfolio of stories.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in English 107 or by portfolio with the instructor permission.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-212 Introduction to Canadian Literature I

3 hours lecture or distance (D), 3 credits


This course is a chronological survey of English-Canadian poetry, fiction, and nonfiction from the sixteenth century to the early twentieth century. It focuses on narratives of exploration and encounter, emigration and settlement, and the emergence of Canada as a nation on the world stage. The course explores the questions surrounding the relationship between Canadian literature and national identity. It seeks to include a range of voices and examines works that are representative, not only of the dominant literary culture, but of different regions, ethnicities, histories and gender identities


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-100 Introduction to Art History and Visual

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is an introduction to the history of art that serves both as a chronology and as a primer to developing the visual and verbal skills that are essential to communicating effectively about visual culture. In conjunction with Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture II / FIN 101, this course explores various methodologies employed in understanding the social, political and historical context in which art making takes place. Course material covers the time period between the cave paintings of prehistory to the 14th century.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 098, ENG-096, or ESL 090; or English assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-101 Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture II

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is a continuation of the introduction to the history of art that began with Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture I / FIN 100. This course serves both as a chronology and as a primer to developing the visual and verbal skills that are essential to communicating effectively about visual culture. It explores various methodologies employed in understanding the social, political and historical context in which art making takes place. Course material covers the time-period from the fourteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century.


Prerequisite(s):

  • FIN 100

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-110 Drawing & 2-DIMENSIONAL Language I

4 hours, includes lecture + studio time, 3 credits


This course is an exploration of drawing and mark-making, it introduces methods, material and concepts particular to the medium of drawing and visual language. The intention of this course is to provide students with foundational skills and artistic vocabulary that will enable them to express themselves in the medium of drawing. An emphasis will be put on comprehension, analysis, and ability to make artistic decisions.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, NIC ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or English assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-250 Modern Art History

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course explores the changing nature of art in the 19th and 20th centuries. It is an examination of the cultural and technological changes that have occurred over this time period and considers their effects on the development of modern art. Course material integrates methodologies of critical cultural theory as a form of analysis to explore the social, political and historical context in which art making takes place and that began in FIN 100/101, the History of Art and Visual Culture.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 101

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-100 Beginners French I

4 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


Beginners French I is the first of four courses in a complete introductory French program, which through the use of authentic, contextual language models, provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in French as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, Beginners French I, II, III & IV also present important aspects of culture, customs and values of the French-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language.


Prerequisite(s):

  • None

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-101 Beginners French II

4 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


Beginners French II is the second of four courses in a complete introductory French program, which through the use of authentic, contextual language models, provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in French as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, Beginners French I, II, III & IV also present important aspects of culture, customs and values of the French-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C minimum in FRE 100

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-145 Intermediate French I

4 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course provides a complete review of French grammar presented within a cultural context. A study of selected literary readings will develop the student's ability to understand and compose short passages, together with typical and provocative articles that will promote active and critical in-class discussions of contemporary issues. Intermediate French I and II are strongly recommended for students who have taken French as a second language.


Prerequisite(s):

  • FRE 120 & 121 or French 12 (or permission of the instructor) Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-146 Intermediate French II

4 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This is the second of the pair of courses, Intermediate French I and II.


Prerequisite(s):

  • FRE 145 or permission of the instructor Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-265 Advanced French I

4 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course provides a continuation of the study of French grammar at an advanced level. A study of selected literary readings (French and French-Canadian), together with a variety of up-to-date and provocative articles and texts will allow the student to further improve both written and spoken French through practice in conversation, comprehension and composition. Advanced French I and II are strongly recommended for students who have taken the French immersion program.


Prerequisite(s):

  • FRE 145 and FRE 146 minimum C or French 100 level university transfer credit.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-266 Advanced French II

4 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This is the second of the pair of courses, Advanced French I and II.


Prerequisite(s):

  • FRE 265 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-280 La Traduction: Translation (A)

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is an introduction to the practice and theory of translation. Through a comparative analysis of the various structures in both French and English, the course will focus on different techniques and strategies to overcome the problems typically encountered when translating from one language to the other. The focus will be particularly placed on grammar, style and syntax.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.
  • C in FRE-266.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-281 La Traduction: Translation (B)

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is a continuation to the practice and theory of translation as well as an introduction to the practice of interpreting (simultaneous, consecutive and liaison). Through a comparative analysis of the various structures in both French and English, the course will focus on different techniques and strategies to overcome the problems typically encountered when translating from one language to the other. The focus will be particularly placed on grammar, style and syntax.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.
  • C in FRE-266.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

GEO-111 Environment, Society and Sustainability

Distance (D), 3 credits


This course focuses on the complex relationships between people and the environment. It provides an introduction to how the biosphere functions, examines the impacts of human activities and resource exploitation on the environment, and considers the potential for a sustainable society. Topics covered include; energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, climate change, water resources, marine resources, biodiversity loss, protected areas and endangered species, human population growth, ecological footprint analysis, and environmental world-views.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HIS-111 Canadian History: Pre-Confederation

3 hours lecture, or distance (D); online; Hybrid online + tutorial, 3 credits


This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. It introduces some of the major political, social and economic events that shaped early Canadian development.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HIS-112 Canadian History: 1867 - Present

3 hours lecture, or distance (D); online; Hybrid online + tutorial; 3 credits


This introductory course provides an overview of Canadian history since 1867, concentrating on the main lines of political, social and economic development. It analyses important issues such as the Riel Rebellion, the shift from a rural to an urban society, the effects of the two World Wars, the Great Depression, the relations between English and French Canadians, and provincial demands for autonomy.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing. HIS 111 recommended.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HIS-215 History of Modern Europe I

3 hours lecture, online, or Hybrid online/tutorial, 3 credits


This course surveys the world of early modern Europe from the flowering of the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, through the age of the religious wars in the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century Age of Enlightenment, and developments in eastern Europe and Russia, culminating in the great watershed of the French Revolution. In addition to covering military and political developments, the course also describes the changes wrought in the social and economic lives of the people of the emerging nation states of Europe.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HIS-216 History of Modern Europe II

3 hours lecture, online, or Hybrid online/tutorial, 3 credits


After a brief exploration of earlier 18th Century events, this course begins with the causes, course and consequences of the French Revolution. This survey course will then examine the major events of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Particular emphasis will be placed on industrialization, the growth of the nation state and imperialism. Social change will also be examined.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HIS-251 History of Women in Canada, 1920 - Present

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course examines the major issues in women's lives after 1920. Particular attention will be paid to the changing roles and expectations of women in the home, in society and in the workplace, and to the forces that brought about these changes.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

LIB-130 Intro to World Religions

1.5 hr Lecture + 1.5 hr Seminar, 3 credits


This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

LIB-131 Eastern and Comparative Religions

1.5 hr Lecture + 1.5 hr Seminar, 3 credits


This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

LIB-210 Topics in World Civilization

1.5 hr Lecture + 1.5 hr Seminar, 3 credits


The topic for Winter 2015 will be Rome From Romulus To The Renaissance. Provides an intensive introduction to the culture and history of a particular world region or to a comparative global theme. Although the topics will vary from year to year, an integrated interdisciplinary approach, core readings of primary texts and student learning through participatory seminars and extensive critical written analyses will be recurring constants. Open to all students as an elective, the course may be coordinated with upcoming Spring Study-Abroad Field Schools.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-102 Calculus for Life Sciences

3 hours lecture, or online, 3 credits


This course covers calculus of one variable with applications to the life sciences. The content includes limits, differentiation of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; applications of differentiation - graphing and optimization problems; exponential growth and decay; integration and areas - techniques, exponential models; Taylor polynomials; introduction to differential equations.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Principles of Mathematics 12, Pre Calculus 12, MAT 067, MAT 060 or MAT 100.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-133 Matrix Algebra

3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits


MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in one of Principles of Math 12, Pre Calculus 12, MAT 067 or MAT 060.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-151 Finite Mathematics

3 hours lecture or web-based distance, 3 credits


This course covers linear systems and Gauss-Jordan elimination, geometric linear programming, matrices and matrix operations, symbolic logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete probability, including conditional probability and Bayes' formula, random variables and their distributions, expectation, Markov chains.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Principles of Math 11, Pre Calculus 11, Foundations of Math 12 or MAT 053.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-162 Mathematics for Elementary Education I

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


MAT 162 and MAT 163 together offer a first year university mathematics course for students entering an elementary education program. Topics covered in MAT 162 include: Set theory and Venn diagrams, symbolic logic, systems of numeration, computation in systems with different bases, mathematical systems, prime numbers, prime factorization and equivalence and order relations, real numbers and their representations, basic concepts of algebra.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Principles of Math 11, Foundations of Math 11, Pre-Calculus Math 11, Applications of Math 12, MAT 053 or MAT 055.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-181 Calculus I

3 hours lecture + 2 hours. lab, 3 credits


Calculus I and II together comprise a 1st-year course in calculus. MAT 181 - Differential calculus of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative - definition, rules, implicit differentiation; applications - curve sketching, maximum-minimum and related rates problems; differentials; antiderivatives. Students will learn how to use a computer algebra system in the lab to enhance their understanding of calculus concepts.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in one of Principles of Math 12, Pre Calculus 12, MAT 067, MAT 060, MAT 100 or MAT 102.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-182 Calculus II

3 hours lecture + 2 hours lab, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • MAT 181 with a minimum of Grade D

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-200 Linear Algebra

3 hrs lecture plus 1.5 hrs tutorial, 3 credits


This course covers systems of linear equations; matrices; determinants; Euclidian vector spaces; general vector spaces, Gram-Schmidt Process, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and quadratic forms.Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or Mat 200.


Prerequisite(s):

  • A in Principles of Math 12, Pre-calculus 12, or MAT 060; or a passing grade in MAT 102 or MAT 181.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-210 Calculus III

3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours Tutorial, 3 credits


This course covers vectors and geometry of space; vector-valued functions; functions of several variables; partial differentiation; multivariable optimization; multiple integrals in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates and applications; change of variables in multiple integrals.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in MAT 182

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-100 Introductory Philosophy: Knowledge & Reality

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to selected problems in the philosophy of religion, metaphysics (theory of reality), and epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics include the existence of God; the nature of mind and its relation to body; computers and consciousness; personal identity and mortality; freewill and determinism; the nature and sources of knowledge; and the justification of scientific beliefs.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing. PHI 100 may be taken before or after PHI 101.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-101 Introductory Philosophy: Values & Society

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to selected problems in philosophical ethics and social-political philosophy. Topics include the relativity or objectivity of values; egoism and altruism; the nature of right and wrong action; classical and contemporary ethical theories; applied ethical problems; the nature of justice; the relation between individuals and society; and approaches to the meaning of life.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing. PHI 101 may be taken before or after PHI 100.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-150 Critical Thinking

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


The course is designed to improve a fundamental ability needed for success in any discipline: the ability to think critically. The focus is on acquiring and sharpening the skills required for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating arguments. The emphasis is on reading and responding to a variety of real academic texts from across the curriculum. No specialized knowledge is presupposed. The course should make students more careful readers and more cogent writers.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-230 Contemporary Moral Issues

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An examination of moral and social issues facing the contemporary world. Topics include animal and environmental ethics; conception and death in the medical context; hate literature and pornography; the ethics of violence. The principal aim is to teach students to think critically about their own views. To this end, philosophical attempts to apply various moral theories to these concrete problems will be assessed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-240 Philosophy of Art

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to philosophical attempts to understand the nature and value of art. The course surveys influential Western theories of art from the ancient to the contemporary period. Issues discussed include attempts to define art, the social value of art, censorship, the nature of aesthetic experience, artistic creativity, problems surrounding interpretation, and the relation of art to political and gender issues.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-260 Business Ethics

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An examination of ethical issues arising in the contemporary business context. A number of classical ethical theories are introduced and applied to a variety of concrete problems such as whistle-blowing, product safety, employee rights, discrimination, international business, the environment, and investing. Emphasis is on mastery of the key ethical concepts and their application to real-life situations.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHY-100 Introduction to Physics I

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, or Web-Based Distance, 3 credits


Introduction to Physics I and II are first year algebra-based courses. They are designed for those students that have a relatively weak background in physics. PHY 100 includes vectors, and scalars, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational motion, thermodynamics, fluids and wave motion. Laboratory work illustrates theoretical concepts and develops laboratory skills and techniques.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Physics 11 or PHY 050.
  • C+ in one of Principles of Math 12, Pre Calculus 12, MAT 060 or MAT 067. Corequisite(s): MAT 102 or MAT 181 (MAT 181 is recommended for most students; however, students continuing on to life sciences at the University of Victoria could take MAT 102).
  • PHY-100L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHY-101 Introduction to Physics II

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, or Web-Based Distance, 3 credits


This is the second of the Introduction to Physics courses. PHY 101 includes light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and special relativity. Laboratory work is used to reinforce theoretical concepts and develop laboratory skills and concepts.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in PHY 100.
  • Corequisite(s): MAT 151 or MAT 182 (MAT 182 is recommended for most students; however, students continuing on to life sciences at the University of Victoria could take MAT 151).
  • Take PHY-101L

For more information visit our timetable

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PHY-120 Principles of Physics I

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 120 includes statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; conservation of energy and momentum; vibration, waves, and sound; heat and thermodynamics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Physics in 12 or PHY 060.
  • C+ in one of Principles of Math 12, PreCalculus 12, MAT 060 or MAT 067.
  • Corequisite: MAT 181 must be taken concurrently, if not already completed.
  • PHY-120L

For more information visit our timetable

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PHY-121 Principles of Physics II

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 121 includes electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in PHY 120
  • C in MAT 181
  • MAT 182 must be taken concurrently, if not already completed

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

POL-119 Canadian Politics

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to the study of Canadian politics at the federal and provincial levels. This course will introduce students to Canadian political cultures and ideologies; political socialization and participation; political parties; the electoral process; leadership issues; interest group articulation and the role of the mass media.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

POL-151 Law And Politics

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is designed to provide an introduction to law, politics, public policy and the administration of justice in Canada. The study of the judicial system as a branch of government will be emphasized. The course will examine key provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms as interpreted by the courts, with a particular focus upon those cases most directly connected to the administration of justice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

POL-203 International Relations

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introductory course designed to acquaint students with some of the fundamental concepts, theories, perspectives and debates in the International Relations field. Topics will include such issues as international security (war, peace, military force; international organizations, international law and human rights; North-South politics; global environment crises; and the growth of a global political economy. Although it is not a course in current affairs per se, integration of contemporary world events and issues will be used to enhance critical understanding.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-130 Introductory Psychology I

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


The course covers the following topics: research methods; biological bases of behaviour; consciousness; nature, nurture and diversity; development; sensation and perception; learning; and memory. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-131 Introductory Psychology II

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


The course covers the following topics: research methods; thinking and language; intelligence; what drives us; emotions, stress and health; social psychology; personality; psychological disorders; therapy. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing. PSY 130 is not a prerequisite.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-202 Health Psychology

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course studies a variety of factors involving health and illness from a bio-psychosocial perspective. Topics include behaviours that affect health such as diet, exercise, stress and substance abuse. The impact of chronic and acute illness on the individual and the social support systems are also covered.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in 1st year English and PSY 130 & 131

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-204 Research Methods in Psychology

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


PSY 204 provides an introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research. Research process (theory, models, hypotheses, predictions); research ethics; experimental methods; non-experimental methods; validity; reliability; sampling; descriptive statistics; central tendency; variability; inferential statistics; and experimental design.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in PSY 130 & PSY 131

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-215 Biological Psychology

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to the biological bases of behaviour and mental functioning. Topics include neural structure, neural communication, motor and sensory processes, brain structure and function, rhythms and sleep, and regulation of internal body states. The biological basis for emotions, learning, and memory will be covered.


Prerequisite(s):

  • PSY 130 & PSY 131 with minimum Grade C or an introductory college level biology course is strongly recommended but not required.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-235 Abnormal Psychology

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.


Prerequisite(s):

  • PSY 130 & 131 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-250 Human Development From Conception Through Childhood

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included.


Prerequisite(s):

  • PSY 130 & 131 Minimum grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-251 Human Development From Adolescence Through Adulthood

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course provides an overview of human development from adolescence through old age. Topics include the impact of genetics and environment, development in adolescence and adulthood, cultural diversity, change and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres, and death, dying and grieving.


Prerequisite(s):

  • PSY 130 & PSY 131. Students may take PSY 251 without PSY 250 but must read Chapters 1 and 2 in the text before starting PSY 251 Minimum grade C

For more information visit our timetable

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PSY-260 Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


The course introduces psychological perspectives on criminal behaviour, emphasizing theoretical and developmental issues, before considering specific crimes (e.g., white collar, domestic violence), and specific offender populations (e.g., sexual offenders, mentally disordered offenders). Students are introduced to relevant theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. CRM 101, PSY 130 and PSY 131 are recommended.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SOC-210 Sociology of Race, Ethnicity & Nation

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course provides a critical examination of the relations between ethnic groups and cultures emphasizing discrimination, the dynamics of global inequality, racism, colonialism and imperialism, assimilation and anti-racist resistance. The emphasis of the course may vary to respond to contemporary issues, although the experience of the racialized peoples and indigenous peoples in Canada will remain a key focus. Students are encouraged to consider the Canadian experience in a global comparative context.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Take SOC-110, SOC-111, or ANT-150 Minimum grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SOC-220 Introduction to Sociological Research Methods

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course introduces the student to the full range of sociological research methods. Students will learn basic qualitative and quantitative techniques, how to design research projects, conduct field research and surveys, apply basic statistical techniques and how to write a research report.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in SOC 110 and SOC 111.
  • C+ in Principles of Math 11 or Pre-Calculus 11 or equivalent.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SOC-240 The Sociology of Love and Sex

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is designed to allow students to explore gender socialization, sexual orientation, the intersexed, courtship, marriage and other institutions based on our sexual relations including patriarchy, organizational arrangements and aspects of sexual relations and politics. The course explores 'normal' sex and sexuality, but also addresses many forms of sexual 'deviance'.


Prerequisite(s):

  • SOC 110 or 111 or instructor permission Minimum grade C

For more information visit our timetable

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SPN-100 Introductory Spanish I

4 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


Introductory Spanish I is a complete introductory Spanish program that provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in Spanish as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, the content of Introductory Spanish I also presents important aspects of culture, customs and values of the Spanish-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language.


Prerequisite(s):

  • None

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SPN-101 Introductory Spanish II

4 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


Introductory Spanish II is a complete introductory Spanish program that provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in Spanish as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, the content of also presents important aspects of culture, customs and values of the Spanish-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language.


Prerequisite(s):

  • SPN 100 Minimum grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SPN-201 Intermediate Spanish II

3 hours lecture + 1 hour lab, 3 credits


This course is designed to further expand students' language skills in Spanish as well as their awareness of the Hispanic culture. It focuses on real communication in meaningful contexts to develop and strengthen students' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while introducing them to the richness of Hispanic literature and culture.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in SPN 200

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

STA-115 Introduction to Statistics

3 credits


This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Principles of Math 11, Precalculus 11, MAT 053, Applications of Math 12, Foundations of Math 11 or MAT 055.

For more information visit our timetable

WST-100 Global Perspectives on Women

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This first year level introductory course explores through feminist thought, where women are situated with regard to the political, economic and socio-cultural constraints that impact their lives. Core foundational concepts include the acquisition of gender identity, power and oppressive relationships as well as an introduction to a variety of "feminisms" through feminist theory.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

WST-101 Issues in Women's Health

3 hours lecture, online, or distance (D), 3 credits


The first year level course provides an introduction to women's health issues from a feminist perspective. Some historical perspectives and the underlying socio-political and economic context of health, as well specific health issues that impact women are explored. Relationships are drawn between patriarchy, capitalism, the medicalization of women's health issues and the impact on women's reproductive and human rights.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090, or Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12 , or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca